The University of Chicago

The University of Chicago Future of the City: The Arts Symposium

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Speaker Bios

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Lee Bey

Lee Bey
Executive Director, Chicago Central Area Committee

Lee Bey

Executive Director, Chicago Central Area Committee

Lee Bey is executive director for the Chicago Central Area Committee (CCAC), a civic group composed of business and cultural leaders devoted to improving the architecture, transportation, cultural life and urban design of downtown Chicago. He is also a writer, lecturer and critic specializing in architecture, urbanism, and the role politics play in the creation of the built environment. He is on-air architecture contributor for Fox News Chicago and writes an architectural blog called “Lee Bey’s Chicago” for public radio station WBEZ.

Before joining the CCAC, Bey was director of governmental affairs for Skidmore Owings & Merrill’s Chicago office. In this role, he served as chief governmental expert and an in-house consultant on urban design issues. Prior to joining SOM, Bey was deputy chief of staff to Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley, a position in which he advised the mayor on architecture and urban planning while helping shape the administration’s position on development, lakefront protection, park construction and architectural preservation. He also helped oversee major redevelopment efforts such as the $660 million Soldier Field renovation.

Previously, Bey was architecture critic for the Chicago Sun-Times. His weekly full-page column examined architecture, preservation, urban planning—and the accompanying political and civic pressures—in Chicago and the Midwest.

Bey is also a photographer whose work has appeared in Forbes, Old House Journal magazine, the Chicago Sun-Times, and Chicago Architect magazine. It is currently the subject of a year-long exhibit called Chicago Then and Now: A Story by Lee Bey, at City Gallery in the Chicago’s historic Water Tower.

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Michelle T. Boone

Michelle T. Boone
Appointed Commissioner, City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events

Michelle T. Boone

Appointed Commissioner, City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events

Michelle Boone is the newly appointed commissioner of Chicago’s Department of Cultural Affairs, which presents and promotes high-quality free festivals, exhibitions, performances, and holiday celebrations each year in parks, the Chicago Cultural Center, and other venues throughout the city.

Most recently, Boone was the senior program officer for Culture at the Joyce Foundation in Chicago, responsible for distributing nearly $2 million annually to arts and cultural institutions in major Midwestern cities. She also managed the Joyce Awards program, a competitive grant opportunity available to arts and culture groups in Chicago, Milwaukee, Detroit, Minneapolis, St. Paul, Cleveland, and Indianapolis to commission new works by artists of color. Boone serves on the board of Grantmakers in the Arts, Arts Alliance Illinois, Third Coast International Audio Festival, South Chicago Arts Center, and has been a reviewer for the National Endowment for the Arts, the Illinois Arts Council, Rasmuson Foundation, and the Cuyahoga Arts and Culture program in Ohio, among others. She is an adjunct professor at DePaul University.

Previously, Boon was the director of Gallery 37, an award-winning job-training in the arts program for Chicago youth through the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs. Her professional career began in entertainment working in television, film, and the recording industry, and later she served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Chad, Africa. Boone holds BS in Telecommunications and a MS in Public Affairs, with an emphasis on nonprofit management, from Indiana University.

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Alan S. Brown

Alan S. Brown
Principal, WolfBrown

Alan S. Brown

Principal, WolfBrown

Alan Brown, principal of WolfBrown, is a leading researcher and management consultant in the arts and culture sector worldwide. His work focuses on understanding consumer demand for cultural experiences and on helping cultural institutions, foundations and agencies to see new opportunities, make informed decisions and respond to changing conditions. His studies have introduced new vocabulary to the lexicon of cultural participation and propelled the field towards a clearer view of the rapidly changing cultural landscape. He speaks frequently at national and international conferences about audience behaviors, trends in cultural participation, and the value system surrounding arts programs.

For 2011, Alan’s work will follow several veins. He is leading several multi-year evaluation and assessment projects for funders, including the Nonprofit Finance Fund’s Leading For The Future initiative and Dance/USA’s Engaging Dance Audiences program, both funded by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, as well as a review of the California Community Foundation’s arts program.

Another focus of Alan’s work is developing measurement systems that communities can use to reliably and repeatedly track levels of public engagement in culture. With Jennifer Novak-Leonard, Alan helped to prepare Research Report #54 for the National Endowment for the Arts, Beyond Attendance: A Multi-Modal Understanding of Arts Participation, which was released in February 2011.

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Scott Burnham

Scott Burnham
Creative Director and Strategist, Urbis Centre for Urban Culture, United Kingdom

Scott Burnham

Creative Director and Strategist, Urbis Centre for Urban Culture, United Kingdom

Scott Burnham is a creative director and strategist for design and urban initiatives, working with a number of cities, institutions and organizations worldwide. He created the Urban Play project for the city of Amsterdam in collaboration with Droog Design to transform areas of the city into public platforms for design interventions; he also created the Bairro Criativo project for the city of Porto, Portugal, to enable individuals to create and design things they felt will improve their daily lives in the city.

As Creative Director for the UK’s Urbis Centre for Urban Culture, Burnham directed numerous large-scale urban projects, including Will Alsop’s “SuperCity” to rethink the future of post-industrial cities, “Urban Oasis” with Berlin’s Office for Subversive Architecture, “At Home” with designer Peter Saville, and “Ill Communication”, the UK’s largest overview of contemporary street art and street-level creativity. Burnham’s other credits include collaborations with Stefan Sagmeister, Marti Guixe, NL Architects, citywide projects in London, Montreal, Prague and Barcelona, and consultations in cities ranging from Riga, Latvia, to Hong Kong.

Burnham is the author of “Finding the Truth in Systems: In Praise of Design Hacking” an exploration of how hacking, grass roots initiatives and open source approaches are transforming design and cities around the world. He has addressed the International Conference on European Policy and the World Urban Development Congress, and has guest lectured at institutions including Design Academy Eindhoven, Netherlands, Sandberg Institute, Amsterdam, Central Saint Martin’s School of Art and Design, London, and the University of Quebec, Montreal.

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Susan Chin

Susan Chin
FAIA (Fellow of the American Institute of Architects); Architect and Assistant Commissioner for Capital Projects, City of New York Department of Cultural Affairs

Susan Chin

FAIA (Fellow of the American Institute of Architects); Architect and Assistant Commissioner for Capital Projects, City of New York Department of Cultural Affairs

Susan Chin administers the Agency’s $700 million capital program including planning, design and construction projects, and capital equipment purchases for 180 cultural organizations throughout the five boroughs. She also supervises the DCA’s Percent for Art and Community Arts Development Programs. Her recent projects include: Orchestra of St. Luke’s DiMenna Center, Museum of the Moving Image Expansion, New York Aquarium Conservation Hall Renovation, Staten Island Museum Building A at Snug Harbor, Bronx River Art Center Renovation, Theater for a New Audience, and Whitney Museum at the High Line.

Chin currently serves on the AIA National Board as NYS Regional Director. She was AIA New York Chapter President in 2005 as the first Asian American and public sector architect. Chin has served on the Mayor’s Institute on City Design, NY State Council on the Arts and various AIA Design Awards panels. She was a Loeb Fellow at Harvard University in 2000 focusing on urban cultural districts.

At Columbia University Law School, NYU, City College of New York and Baruch College, she has been a guest lecturer on the role of the arts in community development. Chin received the AIA NY Chapter Public Architect Award in 2004 and AIA NY State President’s Award in 2006. She holds a MS in Historic Preservation from Columbia University and BS in Architecture from The Ohio State University, where she was 2006 Distinguished Alumna.

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Carol Coletta

Carol Coletta
Director, ArtPlace

Carol Coletta

Director, ArtPlace

Carol Coletta is leading ArtPlace, a new national initiative to accelerate creative placemaking across the U.S. ArtPlace is a collaboration of the nation’s top foundations and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Prior to joining ArtPlace, Coletta was president and CEO of CEOs for Cities, a national network of urban leaders building and sustaining the next generation of great American cities.

For ten years, she hosted and produced a nationally syndicated public radio show, Smart City.

She also served as executive director of the Mayors’ Institute on City Design, a partnership of the National Endowment for the Arts, U.S. Conference of Mayors and American Architectural Foundation.

Coletta is a passionate advocate for cities, and she has devoted her life to answering the question: What makes cities succeed?

Coletta was a Knight Fellow in Community Building at the University of Miami School of Architecture and was named one of the world’s 50 most important urban experts by a leading European think tank. She is a Senior Fellow with the Design Futures Council.

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Betty Farrell

Betty Farrell
Executive Director, Cultural Policy Center at the Harris School of Public Policy Studies and NORC; Senior Lecturer, Irving B. Harris School of Public Policy Studies

Betty Farrell

Executive Director, Cultural Policy Center at the Harris School of Public Policy Studies and NORC; Senior Lecturer, Irving B. Harris School of Public Policy Studies

Before taking the helm of the Cultural Policy Center, Betty Farrell, who earned her Ph.D. in sociology at Harvard University, was associate director of the Master of Arts Program in the Social Sciences and a senior lecturer in the Graduate Social Science Division at the University of Chicago.

Her work in historical sociology has focused on the sociology of culture, public policy, U.S. family patterns, and gender studies. She co-edited with Diane Grams, Entering Cultural Communities: Diversity and Change in the Nonprofit Arts. She is also the author of Family: The Making of an Idea, an Institution, and a Controversy in American Culture and Elite Families: Class and Power in Nineteenth-Century Boston.

Farrell also conducted research on “Cultural Pluralism in the Chicago Art World” with a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities that investigated questions of access, diversity, and inclusivity across a range of Chicago’s established and community-based cultural institutions.

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Alan Freeman

Alan Freeman
Principal Economist, Greater London Authority; Visiting Research Fellow, University of Manitoba; Author, Creativity: London’s Core Business and London: A Cultural Audit

Alan Freeman

Principal Economist, Greater London Authority; Visiting Research Fellow, University of Manitoba; Author, Creativity: London’s Core Business and London: A Cultural Audit

Alan Freeman works for the Greater London Authority, with responsibility for the Cultural and Creative Industries, the Living Wage, and benchmarking World Cities. He is a visiting professor at London Metropolitan University and and a research fellow of Queensland University of Technology. He authored the GLA’s Creativity: London’s Core Business, followed by a regular series of statistics on London’s Creative Industries. He was lead author for ’London: A Cultural Audit’.

Freeman regularly contributes to discussion on cultural statistics, starting with a think piece, Creativity in the Age of the Internet, which attempted an economic definition of creativity. With Hasan Bakhshi, Radhika Desai, Graham Hitchen, and Jason Potts, he has co-authored three provocations on the contribution of the arts to research, development, and innovation. He is co-editor, with Radhika Desai, of a new book series entitled ‘the Future of World Capitalism’. His published articles are accessible at http://ideas.repec.org/e/pfr102.html

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Theaster Gates

Theaster Gates
Artist and Cultural Planner; Creative Director and Founder, Rebuild Foundation; Director of Arts Program Development, Office of the Provost, University of Chicago

Theaster Gates

Artist and Cultural Planner; Creative Director and Founder, Rebuild Foundation; Director of Arts Program Development, Office of the Provost, University of Chicago

In his performances, installations, and urban interventions, Theaster Gates transforms spaces, institutions, relationships, and perceptions.

Exploring architecture as a tool for mediation and meditation, Gates draws from both urbanism and art to highlight what he terms “moments of interstitial beauty.” In 2010, Gates founded the Rebuild Foundation, which concentrates on creative use of space in underserved black neighborhoods in Chicago, St. Louis, Omaha, and Detroit. These sites and the activities associated with them add to a set of emerging practices that anchor places and ideas in cities, forgotten spaces, and unidentified buildings—furthering conversations about where placemaking happens and why.

Currently a Loeb Fellow at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, Gates has received awards from the Joyce Foundation and the Graham Foundation. In 2010 alone, he performed and exhibited at the Whitney Biennial and the Armory Show in New York; the Milwaukee Art Museum; Bruno David Gallery and Pulitzer Museum of Art in St. Louis; and the Contemporary Arts Museum in Houston. He is currently working on projects for the Seattle Art Museum, the Smart Museum of Art in Chicago, and documenta XIII.

Gates received his B.S. and M.S. in Urban Planning, Ceramics, and Religious Studies from Iowa State University and his M.A in Fine Arts and Religious Studies from the University of Cape Town, South Africa.

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Marj Halperin

Marj Halperin
Marj Halperin Consulting; Co-Chair, Mayor-Elect Rahm Emmanuel’s Arts & Culture Transition Team

Marj Halperin

Marj Halperin Consulting; Co-Chair, Mayor-Elect Rahm Emmanuel’s Arts & Culture Transition Team

Marj Halperin has more than 20 years⁏ experience targeting messages to audiences. She⁏s a strategic management professional whose external and internal communications strategies deliver results for corporations, nonprofits and government agencies. You⁏ll find just about all types of communications in her solid track record, from reputation management, crisis communications and media relations to internal communications and culture change strategies.

Before starting her own practice, Halperin served ten years as president and CEO of the League of Chicago Theatres. She guided Chicago⁏s live theater industry to its current, high-profile brand recognized internationally for talent and innovation. As campaign manager, she ran Cook County Commissioner Forrest Claypool⁏s 2006 bid for Cook County Board President. She⁏s held positions directing communications policy for Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley, the Chicago Park District, Illinois State Treasurer and Chicago Public Schools.

Halperin began her professional career as an award-winning journalist, sharpening the research, writing and analytical skills that still guide her work today. Her political commentary is currently featured on WGN-TV Morning News, and her radio reports have been featured on local Chicago radio as well as NPR and NBC Radio Network News. You can still hear Halperin as an occasional guest newscaster on WXRT-FM.

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John Holden

John Holden
Associate, DEMOS; Visiting Professor in Cultural Policy and Management, City University, London; Writer and Speaker

John Holden

Associate, DEMOS; Visiting Professor in Cultural Policy and Management, City University, London; Writer and Speaker

John Holden is an Associate at the think tank DEMOS, where he was Head of Culture from 2000-2008, and a Visiting Professor in Cultural Policy and Management at City University, London. He has Masters Degrees in Law and in Design History.

He has been involved in numerous major projects in the cultural sector across music, film, theatre, heritage, museums and libraries, dealing with issues of policy, evaluation, leadership, workforce development and learning. He has worked with Governments, funding bodies, trusts and foundations, agencies, and many major cultural organisations, including the Royal Shakespeare Company, the British Museum, the Sage, Gateshead, V&A, and Tate.

He is a Trustee of the Hepworth, Wakefield, a member of the Strategy Committee of the Clore Leadership Programme, a member of the Advisory Board of the Arts and Humanities Research Council, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts.

Holden has delivered many keynote speeches in the UK, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, Singapore, the US and Canada. His publications on cultural policy in the UK and beyond include Culture and Class, Democratic Culture, Capturing Cultural Value, Cultural Value and the Crisis of Legitimacy, Culture Online, Creative Reading, Cultural Learning, Hitting the Right Note, and Cultural Diplomacy.

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Sunil Iyengar

Sunil Iyengar
Director, Office of Research & Analysis, National Endowment for the Arts

Sunil Iyengar

Director, Office of Research & Analysis, National Endowment for the Arts

Since Sunil Iyengar’s arrival at the NEA in June 2006, the Office of Research & Analysis has produced such reports as The Arts and Civic Engagement: Involved in Arts, Involved in Life; Artists in the Workforce: 1990-2005; All the World’s A Stage: Growth and Challenges in Nonprofit Theater; and Reading on the Rise: A New Chapter in American Literacy. He is also the primary author of To Read or Not To Read: A Question of National Consequence, and he revised the guide How the United States Funds the Arts for its most recent edition. Iyengar regularly speaks with arts groups, educators, researchers, and journalists about the results and implications of NEA research.

The Office of Research & Analysis maintains the Survey of Public Participation in the Arts, America’s largest periodic survey of adult involvement in arts events and activities. The nationally representative survey has been conducted five times since 1982, in partnership with the U.S. Census Bureau. In 2009 and 2010, Iyengar and his team reported summary results from the survey, along with findings on topics ranging from arts, media, and technology to arts learning.

For a decade, Iyengar worked as a reporter, managing editor, and senior editor for a host of news publications covering the biomedical research, medical device, and pharmaceutical industries. His book reviews have appeared in publications such as the Washington Post, The New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle, The American Scholar, The New Criterion, and Contemporary Poetry Review. Iyengar writes poetry and has a B.A. in English from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

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Maria Rosario Jackson

Maria Rosario Jackson
Senior Research Associate and Director, Culture, Creativity and Communities Program, Metropolitan Housing and Communities Center, The Urban Institute

Maria Rosario Jackson

Senior Research Associate and Director, Culture, Creativity and Communities Program, Metropolitan Housing and Communities Center, The Urban Institute

Maria Rosario Jackson’s work at for the Urban Institute and her research expertise includes neighborhood revitalization and comprehensive community planning, the politics of race, ethnicity and gender in urban settings, and the role of arts and culture in communities.

Her projects in cities throughout the United States have explored the role of intermediaries in comprehensive community planning, the characteristics of place that lead to cultural vitality, the measurement of arts and cultural vitality and the integration of new topics into policies and programs concerned with quality of life.

Jackson’s work has appeared in academic and professional journals as well as edited volumes in the fields of urban planning, sociology, community development and the arts. She has been a speaker at numerous national and international conferences focusing on quality of life, changing demographics, communities and cities of the future, and arts and society.

She currently serves on the boards of the Association of Performing Arts Presenters, the National Performance Network and the Alliance for California Traditional Artists. Formerly, she was on the board of the Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation and the Fund for Folk Culture. Jackson earned a doctorate in Urban Planning from the University of California, Los Angeles and an MPA from the University of Southern California.

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Ann Marie Lipinski

Ann Marie Lipinski
Vice President for Civic Engagement, University of Chicago

Ann Marie Lipinski

Vice President for Civic Engagement, University of Chicago

Ann Marie Lipinski oversees the University of Chicago’s efforts to create a new model for an urban research institution acting in partnership with its city. She is responsible for a portfolio that includes engaging the University in public schools, economic development, and public safety; fostering research connections between the University and the region; and linking the University’s international efforts to Chicago’s status as a global city.

Lipinski previously worked at the Chicago Tribune, where she won a Pulitzer Prize in investigative reporting and served as the paper’s editor and managing editor. Under her stewardship, the Tribune won several Pulitzer Prizes and became a leader in public service, publishing stories that freed innocent prisoners from death row and brought about Illinois’ moratorium on the death penalty, uncovered dangerous product defects, revitalized the South Side lakefront, and scrutinized local and federal education initiatives.

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Lisa Yun Lee

Lisa Yun Lee
Director of the Jane Addams Hull-House Museum

Lisa Yun Lee

Director of the Jane Addams Hull-House Museum

Lisa Yun Lee is the Director of the Jane Addams Hull-House Museum, and a member of the Art History, Museum and Exhibition Studies, and Gender and Women's Studies faculty at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Lisa is also the co-founder of The Public Square at the Illinois Humanities Council, an organization dedicated to creating spaces for dialogue and dissent and for reinvigorating civil society. She has published a book on Frankfurt School philosopher Theodor Adorno, and researches and writes about museums and diversity, cultural and environmental sustainability, and as spaces for fostering radically democratic practices. She is currently working on a book about Harriet Monroe, Hull-House resident, editor and founder of Poetry Magazine. Lisa received her BA in Religion from Bryn Mawr College, and a Ph.D in German Studies from Duke University. She also serves on the boards of the National Public Housing Museum, WBEZ Chicago Public Radio, the International Contemporary Ensemble, and the Third Coast International Audio Festival.

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Walter E. Massey

Walter E. Massey
President, School of the Art Institute of Chicago; President Emeritus, Morehouse College

Walter E. Massey

President, School of the Art Institute of Chicago; President Emeritus, Morehouse College

Walter E. Massey, PhD, is president of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He is also the president emeritus of Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia. Prior to that post, Massey was provost and senior vice president for Academic Affairs of the University of California system. In that role, he was in charge of academic and research planning and policy, budget planning and allocations, and programmatic oversight of three national Department of Energy laboratories. He has also served as professor of physics and dean of the college at Brown University and as professor of physics and vice president of research at the University of Chicago.

A prominent physicist, Massey served as director of Argonne National Laboratory. He also held the post as director of the National Science Foundation, appointed by former President George H.W. Bush. He has been the recipient of more than 30 honorary degrees from institutions including Yale, Northwestern, Amherst, and Ohio State universities. Massey has been an advocate for issues surrounding minority students and education. He developed and directed the Inner City Teachers of Science Program while at Brown University, where college students studying education became tutors and mentors in urban classrooms. In the corporate sector, Massey has served as director and chairman of the board at Bank of America, and he currently serves on the board of McDonald’s and as chairman of the board of the Salzburg Global Seminar. He is a former trustee of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the Council of Foreign Relations.

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Marina Peterson

Marina Peterson
Assistant Professor of Performance Studies, School of Interdisciplinary Arts, Ohio University; Author, Sound, Space and the City: Civic Performance in Downtown Los Angeles; Co-Editor, Global Downtowns

Marina Peterson

Assistant Professor of Performance Studies, School of Interdisciplinary Arts, Ohio University; Author, Sound, Space and the City: Civic Performance in Downtown Los Angeles; Co-Editor, Global Downtowns

Marina Peterson is Assistant Professor of Performance Studies in the School of Interdisciplinary Arts at Ohio University. Her work focuses on music and performance, urban space, and emergent social formations in the context of globalization.

Peterson’s book, Sound, Space, and the City: Civic Performance in Downtown Los Angeles, examines the nature of contemporary urban public life through an ethnography of free public concerts in downtown Los Angeles. She has also examined topics such as privatized public space use regulations, post-9/11 cultural diplomacy, arts and gentrification, and the work of a Skid Row theater group in cities that include Los Angeles, Singapore, and Chicago.

She is co-editor of Global Downtowns, a collection of ethnographic studies that provide critical perspectives on ideals, implementation, and outcomes of city center planning and development in Asia, the Middle East, Africa, the U.S. and Latin America.

Peterson earned her Ph.D. in Anthropology at the University of Chicago. As a cellist, she primarily plays contemporary experimental and improvised music.

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Wendell Pierce

Wendell Pierce
President, Pontchartrain Park Community Development Corporation; Actor, The Wire and Treme

Wendell Pierce

President, Pontchartrain Park Community Development Corporation; Actor, The Wire and Treme

With credits in film, television, and theater, actor Wendell Pierce is truly a modern-day renaissance man. A New Orleans native, Pierce’s heart has never really left home. In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and the continued struggle to rebuild and revitalize New Orleans, Pierce has made a commitment to use his time, talent, treasury, and celebrity to bring back his old neighborhood, Pontchartrain Park. His early yet significant efforts were recently celebrated at the 51st Annual Weiss Awards, sponsored by the New Orleans Council for Community and Justice.

Pierce began his training as an actor at the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts. Inspired by the Free Southern Theater, a touring company that thrived during the Civil Rights Movement, he worked with many local companies in theater and television. Pierce appeared in The Winter’s Tale at the Tulane Shakespeare Festival while producing and hosting Think About It, a youth-themed talk show, for the local NBC affiliate station. He also hosted a weekly jazz show on WYLD RADIO FM98 called Extensions from Congo Square. He ended his high school career as one of 20 Presidential Scholars in the Arts, receiving his medallion in a White House ceremony. After leaving New Orleans, Wendell trained at the Juilliard School where he received his BFA in 1985.

Pierce’s filmography includes, among many, director Taylor Hackford’s Ray, Warren Beatty’s Bulworth, Spike Lee’s Get on the Bus and Malcolm X, Forrest Whitaker’s Waiting to Exhale, Brian De Palma’s Bonfire of the Vanities, and Barry Levinson’s Sleepers.

Pierce currently stars in the HBO series Treme, set in New Orleans. He also starred in HBO’s drama series, The Wire, and appeared opposite Queen Latifah in the critically acclaimed HBO movie, Life Support. He has guest starred on Numb3rs, Law and Order and many more.

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Colm A. O'Muircheartaigh

Colm A. O'Muircheartaigh
Dean and Professor, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago; Senior Fellow, NORC

Colm A. O'Muircheartaigh

Dean and Professor, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago; Senior Fellow, NORC

Colm A. O'Muircheartaigh is dean of the University of Chicago's Harris School of Public Policy Studies, professor in the Harris School, and senior fellow in the National Opinion Research Center (NORC). He is one of the nation's leading experts in the design and implementation of social investigations.

An applied statistician, O'Muircheartaigh's research has focused on the design of complex surveys across a wide range of populations and topics, and on fundamental issues of data quality, including the impact of errors in responses to survey questions, cognitive aspects of question wording, and latent variable models for non-response.

He joined the Harris School faculty in 1998 from the London School of Economics and Political Science, where he was the first director of the Methodology Institute and a faculty member of the Department of Statistics since 1971.

A fellow of the Royal Statistical Society and the American Statistical Association, and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, O'Muircheartaigh has served as a consultant to a wide range of public and commercial organizations around the world, including the OECD and the United Nations.

O'Muircheartaigh received his undergraduate education at University College Dublin, and his graduate education at the London School of Economics.

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Nick Rabkin

Nick Rabkin
Senior Research Scientist, Academic Research Centers, NORC

Nick Rabkin

Senior Research Scientist, Academic Research Centers, NORC

Nick Rabkin’s career in the arts began with work for Chicago’s Organic Theater Company, producing new works for the stage. He was the deputy commissioner of cultural affairs for Chicago under Mayors Harold Washington and Richard M. Daley. Rabkin was also the senior program officer for the arts and culture at the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation for a decade. He directed the Center for Arts Policy at Columbia College Chicago until 2008.

His priority in all of those positions was advancing the arts in communities and education. He has written widely on arts education, including Putting the Arts in the Picture: Reframing Education in the 21st Century (2005), and a recent monograph on arts education and arts participation for the National Endowment for the Arts.

Rabkin recently completed the first large scale study of teaching artists at NORC at the University of Chicago, and is a research affiliate of the Center for Cultural Policy at the University.

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Damon Rich

Damon Rich
Designer and Artist; Founder, Center for Urban Pedagogy; Urban Designer and Waterfront Planner, City of Newark, New Jersey

Damon Rich

Designer and Artist; Founder, Center for Urban Pedagogy; Urban Designer and Waterfront Planner, City of Newark, New Jersey

Damon Rich is a designer and artist, and currently serves as the Urban Designer for the City of Newark, New Jersey. His work has been exhibited internationally at venues including the 2008 Venice Architecture Biennale, Storefront for Art and Architecture, the Canadian Centre for Architecture, and the Netherlands Architecture Institute.

In Newark, Rich leads design efforts with public and private actors to improve the city’s public spaces, including the launch of the This is Newark! Public Art Program in 2009. Rich is also overseeing the design and development of the city’s first riverfront park.

In 1997, Rich founded the Center for Urban Pedagogy, a New York City nonprofit organization that uses design to increase the impact of public participation in urban planning and community development, where he was the Creative Director for 10 years. His most recent solo exhibition Red Lines Housing Crisis Learning Center was on view at the Queens Museum of Art in 2009.

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Deborah F. Rutter

Deborah F. Rutter
President, Chicago Symphony Orchestra Association

Deborah F. Rutter

President, Chicago Symphony Orchestra Association

Deborah F. Rutter joined the Chicago Symphony Orchestra Association as president in 2003. In this role, she oversees the operations of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and the Symphony Center Presents, and the Institute for Learning, Access, and Training. This includes the Civic Orchestra of Chicago, the Chicago Symphony Chorus, and the Symphony Center facility.

Prior to joining the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Rutter held several key positions including the executive director of the Seattle Symphony and the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra and orchestra manager for the Los Angeles Philharmonic.

Rutter is involved in a number of national and local cultural organizations and currently is a member of the board of the Illinois Arts Alliance, the League of American Orchestras, the Grant Park Conservancy, and the Solti Foundation. She is a member of the Commercial Club of Chicago, the Chicago Network, the Economic Club of Chicago, and the prestigious Curtis Institute’s Board of Overseers. She also is a visiting committee member for the University of Chicago Department of Music.

Rutter has previously served as board member and president of the Washington State Arts Alliance Board of Directors as well as the Association of California Symphony Orchestras; chair of the Policy Committee for the League of American Orchestras; and on numerous panels for the National Endowment for the Arts, the Copland Fund, the California Arts Council, and the California State/Local Partnership. Rutter is a graduate of Stanford University and holds an MBA from the University of Southern California.

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Joan Shigekawa

Joan Shigekawa
Senior Deputy Chairman, National Endowment for the Arts

Joan Shigekawa

Senior Deputy Chairman, National Endowment for the Arts

Joan Shigekawa, currently the Senior Deputy is the former Associate Director for Foundation Initiatives at the Rockefeller Foundation where she led the NYC Cultural Innovation Fund and was the founding officer for the Southeast Asia cultural exchange program and for the Creativity in a Digital Age area of work.

Shigekawa was the first Director of the Arts Program at the Nathan Cummings Foundation in New York. Prior to that, Shigekawa was with the staff of the Metropolitan Museum of Art where she directed the international Production Laboratory of the Program for Art on Film, a joint venture of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the J. Paul Getty Trust.

Shigekawa has 20 years’ experience in film, television and the theater, and has served as an arts advisor for a broad range of projects in the visual, performing and media arts. She has served as a Mayoral appointee to the New York City Cultural Affairs Advisory Commission. She has also served on the Board of Directors for Grantmakers in the Arts, a national organization of foundation executives in the arts and is the former Chair of Grantmakers in Film and Electronic Media, an affinity group of the Council on Foundations. In addition she has served as a trustee of the New York Foundation for the Arts, Muse Film and Television, the New York Council for the Humanities, and the Independent Television Service (ITVS).

Shigekawa is a graduate of Bryn Mawr College.

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David Simon

David Simon
Author, Journalist, and Writer/Producer; Creator of The Wire and Treme

David Simon

Author, Journalist, and Writer/Producer; Creator of The Wire and Treme

David Simon is a Baltimore-based journalist, author and television producer. Born in Washington, he came to Baltimore in 1983 to work as a crime reporter at The Baltimore Sun. While at the paper, he reported and wrote two works of narrative non-fiction, Homicide: A Year On The Killing Streets and The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood, the former an account of a year spent with the city homicide squad and the latter, a year spent on a West Baltimore drug corner.

Homicide became the basis for the NBC drama which aired from 1993 to 1999 and for which Simon worked as a writer and producer after leaving The Sun in 1995. The Corner became an HBO miniseries and won three Emmy Awards in 2000. “The Wire”, a subsequent HBO drama, aired from 2002 to 2008 and depicted a dystrophic American city contending with a fraudulent drug war, the loss of its industrial base, political and educational systems incapable of reform and a media culture oblivious to all of the above.

Also last year, Simon served as a writer and executive producer of HBO’s “Generation Kill”, a miniseries depicting U.S. Marines in the early days of the Iraq conflict. He is currently at work on a drama about post-Katrina New Orleans entitled “Treme.” Simon also does prose work for The New Yorker, Esquire and The Washington Post, among other publications.

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Mark J. Stern

Mark J. Stern
Professor of Social Welfare and History; Co-Director, Urban Studies Program, University of Pennsylvania

Mark J. Stern

Professor of Social Welfare and History; Co-Director, Urban Studies Program, University of Pennsylvania

Mark J. Stern is Kenneth L. M. Pray Professor of Social Welfare and co-director of the Urban Studies program at the University of Pennsylvania. He holds a BA from Reed College, an MA from the University of Toronto, and a PhD in history from York University (Canada). He has authored or co-authored five books, including One Nation Divisible: What America Was and What It Is Becoming (with Michael B. Katz, Russell Sage Foundation Press, 2006).

Since 1994, Stern has been principal investigator for the Social Impact of the Arts Project (SIAP), a research program of Penn’s School of Social Policy and Practice. SIAP has focused on developing methods for measuring the ways that the arts and cultural engagement influence urban communities and applying those methods to studies of metropolitan Philadelphia. Recent reports by SIAP include “Cultivating ‘Natural’ Cultural Districts”, “From Creative Economy to Creative Society”, and “Migrants, Communities, and Culture”, all co-authored with Susan Seifert. His monograph, “Age and Arts Participation: A Case Against Demographic Destiny” was published by the National Endowment for the Arts in 2011.

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Robert J. Zimmer

Robert J. Zimmer
President, University of Chicago

Robert J. Zimmer

President, University of Chicago

On July 1, 2006, Robert J. Zimmer became the 13th President of the University of Chicago.

Prior to his appointment as President, Zimmer was a University of Chicago faculty member and administrator for more than two decades specializing in the mathematical fields of geometry, particularly ergodic theory, Lie groups, and differential geometry. As a University of Chicago administrator, Zimmer served as Chairman of the Mathematics Department, Deputy Provost, and Vice President for Research and for Argonne National Laboratory. He also served as Provost at Brown University from 2002-2006, returning to Chicago in 2006 to become President of the University.

As President of the University, he serves as Chair of the Board of Governors of Argonne National Laboratory and Chair of the Board of Directors of Fermi Research Alliance LLC, the operator of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. He also serves on the President’s Committee on the National Medal of Science, and is on the executive committee of the Council on Competitiveness. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

President Zimmer is the author of two books, Ergodic Theory and Semisimple Groups (1984) and Essential Results of Functional Analysis (1990), and more than 80 mathematical research articles. He served on the Board of Mathematical Sciences of the National Research Council from 1992 to 1995, and was on the executive committee from 1993 to 1995. Zimmer held the title of Max Mason Distinguished Service Professor of Mathematics at Chicago before leaving for Brown, where he was the Ford Foundation Professor of Mathematics in addition to being Provost.

President Zimmer earned his A.B., summa cum laude, from Brandeis University in 1968 and a Ph.D. in mathematics from Harvard University in 1975. He joined the Chicago faculty as an L.E. Dickson Instructor of Mathematics in 1977. He was also on the faculty of the U.S. Naval Academy from 1975 to 1977 and has held visiting positions at Harvard University and at institutions in Israel, France, Australia, Switzerland, and Italy.

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